Oh, my friends. You are in for a treat today. Last week I told you about finding that delicious coconut butter. Well, sitting on the shelf next to the coconut butter was a jar of the same coconut butter…mixed with cocoa. Optimistically, I read the label. It was made with agave, which is not a GAPS-legal food. But then I started thinking, “I bet I could make that.”

And make it, I did.

At first I ate it out of a custard cup, kind of like a mousse. It was delicious. But I wondered if I could refrigerate it, and then make truffles.

Oh, yes. I most certainly could.

You cannot even imagine how delicious these truffles are. I doubted my ability to judge sweet treats, not having had any for so long, so I gave one to the Sweetie Pie to sample. He assured me that my palate was not mistaken. These truffles are to die for.

Now, it must be acknowledged that there is some controversy over using chocolate in GAPS. It’s technically listed as a GAPS-illegal food. But I couldn’t understand why coffee and red wine would be allowed, but unsweetened cocoa would not be. I searched around a little bit on the web and found some evidence to believe that chocolate (the organic and unsweetened kind–not a Hershey bar) can be part of a GAPS diet.

Granted, I’m eating it sooner than I ought to be. All the advice I read said that chocolate is an advanced GAPS food only to be eaten after significant healing has taken place. I know I’m jumping the gun a bit. But if indulging in a smidge of chocolate (which is all that’s in one of these truffles) doesn’t make me feel sick and keeps me on the GAPS diet, I’d call it a good thing. If you have concerns about the chocolate, you could certainly leave it out and enjoy some pure coconut truffles.

I have so many ideas for how to adapt this recipe to make dozens of truffle varieties that I can hardly wait to get started. Dip the truffles in melted chocolate for a candy coating. Mix in a handful or two of coconut to create imitation Hail Merry macaroons. Add peppermint oil to the mix. Stuff an almond in the middle, or a cherry, or some cashew butter. The possibilities are endless!

Post a comment if you try any variations, and let us know how it turned out for you. This recipe makes about 12-15 truffles (enough to last a day, two days if you can really bridle yourself)

Print Recipe

Cocoa-nut Truffles

These truffles are delicious, and so adaptable. Feel free to get creative and mix in other items.

Source: Erin at Plan to Eat

Serves: 12

Ingredients

  • 1 oz. organic pure and unsweetened chocolate
  • 1 Tbs coconut oil
  • 1/2 tsp vanilla
  • 2 Tbs unfiltered honey
  • 1/4 cup raw coconut butter
  • organic pure and unsweetened cocoa powder for rolling

Directions

  1. In a double boiler, melt the chocolate with the coconut oil, vanilla, and honey until smooth. Remove from heat. Stir in the coconut butter until smooth. Refrigerate until firm.
  2. Using a melon baller or a spoon, roll the chocolate mixture into small balls using your hands. Work quickly, so the chocolate won’t get too soft. Roll the balls in cocoa powder. Store truffles in the refrigerator.

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